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Anonymous said: Where can I see back issue of the magazine from the 60's and 70's

You can view archival covers of the magazine from the ’60s and ’70s in our covers section. However, we don’t currently have all the features from those decades available on our site. We do hope to add them to our site as soon as possible, but it will be a gradual process. Hope that helps!

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Putting a public face on the rape debate—his own
From the post:

McLean had been weighing whether to share his deeply personal story ever since Missouri Republican Congressman Todd Akin attempted to define “legitimate rape” during an interview Sunday where he also theorized that rape victims’ bodies could “shut that whole thing down.” But for McLean, the tipping point came this week when Iowa Republican Congressman Steve King made the media rounds defending Akin, saying, “Well, I just haven’t heard of that being a circumstance that’s been brought to me in any personal way, and I’d be open to discussion about that subject matter.”

Read Rich Eldredge’s blog post

Putting a public face on the rape debate—his own

From the post:

McLean had been weighing whether to share his deeply personal story ever since Missouri Republican Congressman Todd Akin attempted to define “legitimate rape” during an interview Sunday where he also theorized that rape victims’ bodies could “shut that whole thing down.” But for McLean, the tipping point came this week when Iowa Republican Congressman Steve King made the media rounds defending Akin, saying, “Well, I just haven’t heard of that being a circumstance that’s been brought to me in any personal way, and I’d be open to discussion about that subject matter.”

Read Rich Eldredge’s blog post

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"Sheriff on Deck!"
From the article:

The sheriff in charge of the jail is a man named Victor Hill, who took office on January 1, 2005. Hill wears a pencil moustache, clock-shaped Gino Franco cufflinks that actually tell time and a badge hanging from a chain around his neck. He stands 5-feet-5. Short men with power and the lust for more are inevitably likened to Napoleon, and in his 18 months as sheriff, Hill hasn’t done much to invalidate the comparison. On his first Monday in office, he summoned 27 employees to the jail on the pretense of reinstating them. Instead, he fired them. He assigned sharpshooters to watch over the proceedings as the sacked workers—most of whom had supported the outgoing sheriff that Hill had unseated—handed over their guns and badges.

Read Steve Fennessy’s full feature story
Flashback Friday: Victor Hill is facing 37 felony charges, but he may still win this Tuesday’s runoff election and regain his position as Clayton’s sheriff. Check out our 2006 feature on the man who fired 27 deputies on his first day in office, and tell us: How would you vote?
Photograph by Jonathan Hollada

"Sheriff on Deck!"

From the article:

The sheriff in charge of the jail is a man named Victor Hill, who took office on January 1, 2005. Hill wears a pencil moustache, clock-shaped Gino Franco cufflinks that actually tell time and a badge hanging from a chain around his neck. He stands 5-feet-5. Short men with power and the lust for more are inevitably likened to Napoleon, and in his 18 months as sheriff, Hill hasn’t done much to invalidate the comparison. On his first Monday in office, he summoned 27 employees to the jail on the pretense of reinstating them. Instead, he fired them. He assigned sharpshooters to watch over the proceedings as the sacked workers—most of whom had supported the outgoing sheriff that Hill had unseated—handed over their guns and badges.

Read Steve Fennessy’s full feature story

Flashback Friday: Victor Hill is facing 37 felony charges, but he may still win this Tuesday’s runoff election and regain his position as Clayton’s sheriff. Check out our 2006 feature on the man who fired 27 deputies on his first day in office, and tell us: How would you vote?

Photograph by Jonathan Hollada

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Commentary: I ate Cinnabon’s Pizzabon so you won’t have to

From the post:

There’s something insidious to me about the self-aware logic that underpins the stunt sandwich: It’s asking the customer to be in on the joke of fast food. The concept is practically yelling, “You remember how gross and unhealthy and environmentally unsustainable fast food is? Well, this is, like, TWICE as gross as that. Come eat it.” The Pizzabon asks the consumer to acknowledge the unappetizing absurdity of fast food while participating in it. It’s the same logic that operates in reality television: encouraging us to pity and laugh at people while participating in their glorification. The Pizzabon is the Honey Boo Boo Child of food.

Read Wyatt Williams’s blog post

Promo photo courtesy Cinnabon, real photo by author

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Atlanta’s Own Onion: Atlanta Banana
From the article:

Launched in December 2011, it’s become the warped mirror that you can’t help but peruse when ATL drama turns from precious to precarious.

Read Jackson Reeves’s full story
Photograph by flickr user Public Domain Photos (Emilian Robert Vicol) via Getty Images

Atlanta’s Own Onion: Atlanta Banana

From the article:

Launched in December 2011, it’s become the warped mirror that you can’t help but peruse when ATL drama turns from precious to precarious.

Read Jackson Reeves’s full story

Photograph by flickr user Public Domain Photos (Emilian Robert Vicol) via Getty Images

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Bone Lick BBQ opens on the Westside today
From the post:

About two years ago, our dining critic Bill Addison went in search of the best barbeque in the Atlanta area. He searched low and high, finding joints hidden far outside of the city in towns like Jackson and Gainesville. A total of 58 joints were reviewed in all. After all that searching, just one place inside Atlanta made Addison’s top five and it wasn’t even a full-time BBQ joint.

Read Wyatt Williams’s full blog post
Photograph by Erik Dixon

Bone Lick BBQ opens on the Westside today

From the post:

About two years ago, our dining critic Bill Addison went in search of the best barbeque in the Atlanta area. He searched low and high, finding joints hidden far outside of the city in towns like Jackson and Gainesville. A total of 58 joints were reviewed in all. After all that searching, just one place inside Atlanta made Addison’s top five and it wasn’t even a full-time BBQ joint.

Read Wyatt Williams’s full blog post

Photograph by Erik Dixon

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Anatomy of a Divorce
From the feature story:

I will try to tell honestly what it was like for a woman to have a relationship with me and what I was thinking and how I was feeling toward her and how it seemed like a very bad thing to love me. Because I was raised an American male, I will tell that I did not learn to give or receive affection, that I did not learn to weep when I was hurting, that I did not learn to love women in ways that made them feel secure and desirable and needed. I will tell of the day I told the great Atlanta therapist, Marion O’Neill, that whenever I uttered the words “I love you” to a woman, they had the hollow dispossessed sound of someone ordering a meal for the first time in a foreign language. I will tell that I felt inexhaustible but inexpressible reserves of love within me, and I searched for women who were able to translate my silences, interpreters who understood about the inarticulate lover screaming from within.

Read Pat Conroy’s full essay
Flashback Friday: The eminent author’s poetic 1978 article on the pain of divorce
Illustration by Jaff Seijas

Anatomy of a Divorce

From the feature story:

I will try to tell honestly what it was like for a woman to have a relationship with me and what I was thinking and how I was feeling toward her and how it seemed like a very bad thing to love me. Because I was raised an American male, I will tell that I did not learn to give or receive affection, that I did not learn to weep when I was hurting, that I did not learn to love women in ways that made them feel secure and desirable and needed. I will tell of the day I told the great Atlanta therapist, Marion O’Neill, that whenever I uttered the words “I love you” to a woman, they had the hollow dispossessed sound of someone ordering a meal for the first time in a foreign language. I will tell that I felt inexhaustible but inexpressible reserves of love within me, and I searched for women who were able to translate my silences, interpreters who understood about the inarticulate lover screaming from within.

Read Pat Conroy’s full essay

Flashback Friday: The eminent author’s poetic 1978 article on the pain of divorce

Illustration by Jaff Seijas

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Neal Boortz: Have Mouth, Will Talk
From the post:
”I’m an entertainer,” Boortz says. “Not a journalist or spokesman for anybody. Truth is a lot of my listeners absolutely hate what I have to say.” No kidding, Neal. Talk radio is supposed to be a conservative phenomenon, a crie de coeur from America’s great Gap-wearing, feminine hygiene spraying middle class, those heartland millions who distrust the government and its lackeys in the media. Here’s Boortz playing that violin: “People listen to my show. They hear things that they never read in the newspaper and never see on TV news. And they say ‘Well damn! Why didn’t I read that in The Constitution this morning?’ “
Read Vincent Coppola’s full feature story
Flashback Friday: As the talk radio host nears closer to retirement, a look back on his career with this 1998 profile.
Photograph by Jason Maris

Neal Boortz: Have Mouth, Will Talk

From the post:

”I’m an entertainer,” Boortz says. “Not a journalist or spokesman for anybody. Truth is a lot of my listeners absolutely hate what I have to say.” No kidding, Neal. Talk radio is supposed to be a conservative phenomenon, a crie de coeur from America’s great Gap-wearing, feminine hygiene spraying middle class, those heartland millions who distrust the government and its lackeys in the media. Here’s Boortz playing that violin: “People listen to my show. They hear things that they never read in the newspaper and never see on TV news. And they say ‘Well damn! Why didn’t I read that in The Constitution this morning?’ “

Read Vincent Coppola’s full feature story

Flashback Friday: As the talk radio host nears closer to retirement, a look back on his career with this 1998 profile.

Photograph by Jason Maris

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"A strange, witty, occasionally confounding, and often wonderful mix of eccentricities defines the Spence, the year’s most anticipated opening. Its name carries an unofficial subtitle: “The restaurant where Richard Blais finally returns to the kitchen.” The first bit of idiosyncrasy is evident before you even enter the place. On the corner of Fifth and Spring streets, in front of the congested valet stand, sits a small wooden planter holding an overflow of herbs and flowers, with a chalkboard at the top that has “The SPENCE” written in neat, steady penmanship. It recalls a sign beckoning guests to a country bed-and-breakfast. But if it puts you in the mind-set of cottages and farmlands for a moment, the techno thumpity-thump vibrating in the restaurant’s door handle brings you right back to Atlanta."

— Bill Addison, The Spence Gets Two Stars

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"The director explains, “All of Charity’s boyfriends, normally played by four actors, are played by Trent Blanton [another former Atlantan]. Doing that reveals that people do have a ‘type’ while dating, even though they don’t realize it.” Daniels also gave dozens of one-line speaking parts, normally shared by an ensemble, to one actor."

— Curt Holman on how the Dad’s Garage cofounder will reinterpret Sweet Charity at Aurora Theatre